Saturday, February 14, 2015

STUDIO SATURDAYS: The Art Collector

Good-afternoon and welcome to the third installment of our STUDIO SATURDAYS blog postings- where we share sneak peeks into creative art spaces, ask  artists why they do what they do, and  chat to the people who love art just as much as we do!

Since today is Valentine's Day, we thought we'd introduce you to someone that is in love with ART. Contrary to popular belief, the "art collector" isn't always a "dark rimmed glasses and  tweed jacket wearing man with a black turtle neck "- (not that there's anything wrong with that) but we wanted to show our readers that art collecting and the love of art can afflict everyone and anyone...sometimes when you least expect it!  We thought we'd begin with asking our friend Karen to share a few words about how she feels about art. I say friend, because that's honestly what  many of our customers become. Art is a beautiful thing.


Is owning original artwork contagious? 

Yes, but I figure there are worse addictions to have. I will forgo food and drink to pay out a piece, as art is nourishment in itself.

How has owning original art changed the way you feel in your home? 
Art for me is a visual reflection of what I find appealing and interesting, whether it be something that makes me smile, reflect or simply get lost in the atmosphere. Being surrounded by pieces that I feel in some way are a part of me, makes me feel comfortable and warm in my home. I’ve always danced to the beat of my own drum and hence my tastes in art are wide, varied and often quirky. This is reflected in the things I surround myself with.
Folk art owls by Basil Doucette and Owl Painting by Melissa Townsend


Have you met any of the artists who’s work you’ve purchased? Does that affect your relationship with the art piece(s)?
I have. Most often I have purchased or at least admired a piece and afterwards met the artist. I’m happy to say that meeting the artists have added to my enjoyment of the pieces, as they are what I imagine them to be: contemplative, humble and genuine people. They invest themselves in their work and leave some of who they are on the canvass or in the sculpture, so I find generally if the piece of art appeals to me, the personality of the artist also appeals to me. 


In purchasing local artwork, you’ve had a direct impact on our arts community, by helping it thrive and build momentum. How does that make you feel? 

There is so, so much talent right at our doorstep, in the visual arts and the performing arts, why go further. I love nothing better than to help support, in a small way, the extremely talented folks living and creating magic in our region. Life without original art and original live music is unimaginable to me, so doing my part to ensure these talented people can continue to make a living, makes me feel great.

Tell us about your favourite piece! 
Selecting a favourite piece is like picking a favourite family member. I could talk about them all individually and what they mean to me, as each one tells a story. I never buy for financial investment appreciation sake but always because I love the piece and how it makes me feel when I walk by it or stand in front of it in quiet contemplation. Don’t make me pick one! 
Folk art sculpture by Barry Colpitts and small painting by Gordon MacDonald

Has visiting the gallery on a regular basis changed the way you look at artwork / developed, or changed your taste in art?
I think what appeals to us as the years go by may change – fashion trends, colour schemes, etc… but I find if I am drawn to a piece of art, not matter how much time goes by, it doesn’t lose its charm or my favour. I love it now and I will love it 30 years from now. I enjoy being exposed to as much art as possible, all styles and medium, but it just seems to affirm my wide and varied tastes. I can’t pinpoint all the factors that make up, “the one” that gets to me, but I know it when I see it.

How has collecting artwork changed the way you look at the world around you?
It’s a bit of a yin yang situation. My art influences how I see the world, and seeing the world around me influences what attracts me at any given time. The world is a visual feast, if you take the time to really look. You can find it in your back yard, in the quite of a starlit night in the wilderness or in the bustle of a city of several million. I get as much enjoyment from laying down in a field looking at the beauty of the micro worlds of insects, rocks and blades of grass, as much as I do ambling around the Louvre. Art is everywhere. Beauty and breathlessness are everywhere. You just have to stop and look.
Two works by Trevor Van den Eijnden

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